Navigating Healthcare – Patient Safety and Personal Healthcare Management

Treating Mental Health

Posted in Uncategorized by drnic on July 6, 2017

Don’t judge my path if you haven’t walked my journey

Mental Labels

Just the term “Mental” induces reactions and responses from every corner of our society, and mostly they are not positive. Perhaps part of the problem can be attributed to the broad and different definitions applied to the term that includes its use as an adjective relating to the mind or disorders of the mind but it also has an informal us as “insane” or “crazy”

It’s no wonder that when we refer to someone as having “Mental problems” or a “Mental Condition” – so perhaps we need to change the terminology to start addressing “Mental” health as part of our overall health. The precision of language and terminology is important but we have a tendency that appears to be increasingly misused, or perhaps it just appears that was because it is magnified by social media and the 24/7/365 news cycle. For example, the term “Depression” is a clinical diagnosis that has some very specific symptoms and durations but the term is used excessively in place of sadness, misery, or sorrow. SO for this article, I will refer to “Diseases of the Brain” rather than “Mental Disorders”

 

Part of Physical Health

A recent article by John Campo, MD, Professor, and chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Ohio State University pointed out the mismatch between the prevalence and impact of diseases of the brain and the lack of legitimacy as a “real disease

The treatment of mental illness has long been held back by the sense that disorders of emotion, thinking, and behavior somehow lack legitimacy and instead reflect individual weakness or poor life choices

Some of this likely stems from our lack fo understanding relative to brain disorders evidenced in history by the way we viewed and “treated” anyone deemed to be unusual or different. These attitudes date back to at leat the 13th Century and “St. Mary of Bethlehem” in London built in 1247 and used as an institution for the insane. It was colloquially referred to as “Bedlam” hospital (yes that is where the term “Bedlam” came from) that featured horrific treatments from “rotational Therapy”

Imagine being stuck on the Mad Hatters Tea Cup ride at high speed for hours

 

And extended to beatings, bloodletting, and starvation! This sordid history is covered by the Museum of Healthcare Blog. This attitude extended into my medical school training where we were dispatched to Friern Hospital (formerly Colney Hatch Lunatic Asylum) that at its peak was home to some 2,500 patients with disorders of the brain. My clinical experience there included a harrowing personal experience that still shapes my behavior to this day.

 

Long corridors with Wards radiating out

 

Moving to Whole Care

 

The disconnect between the specialty of Psychiatry and the rest of medicine is rooted in our inability to observe and explain the workings of the brain. Even some of our treatments work but we struggle to understand why or how. This manifests in the challenge of honest acceptance of having a disease of the brain and being able to find help to treat that condition. For most people, our exposure to this world is limited to the Hollywood lens, like “Awakenings” starring Robin Williams and Robert de Niro

 

 

It is sad to note that Robin Williams suffered a sometimes public struggle with a brain disorder and ultimately committed suicide secondary to his suffering of Lewy Body Dementia

Based on the true story and book “Awakenings” written by Oliver Sachs – the British Neurologist, naturalist, and author who died back in 2015. He was a prolific writer who wrote with such eloquence and mastery of language you can lose yourself in his books.

‘Healing’,
Papa would tell me,
‘is not a science,
but the intuitive art
of wooing Nature.’

The Art of Healing – W.H. Auden

 

Science is Helping

The good news is that technology and science are helping as we unlock some of the mysteries of the brain’s function and the diseases that impact function. In fact, in many instances, we are discovering that the brain plays a much larger role in many diseases and we ignore this at our peril. We continue to unlock the chemical and physiological functions in the brain and as the science advances so too does the integration of the specialty psychiatry under the same roof as the rest of medicine.

There are now a number of initiatives working to expand our understanding, coordinate research, results, and findings that included the 2013 announcement by President Obama for the “BRAIN Initiative” (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) that is homed at the National Institute of Health (NIH) and complemented by the The Human Brain Project from the European Union. The initiatives are not without problems and uncertainty of funding continues to challenge progress but understanding, science, and data remain a central requirement to progress.

There are some areas of progress from industry and Arshya Vahabzadeh, MD, the Chief Medical Officer at Brainpower has been championing Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality as a tool to help the growing population of Autism patients handle the complex world of emotions and human interactions. As he highlighted Virtual and Augmented Reality was a hot topic at the recent American Psychiatric Association Meeting

 

And was featured in this Medscape article: Virtual Reality a Game Changer for Psychiatry (Medscape)

 

Incremental Improvements in Brain Disorders

As Dr. Campo pointed out

Better understanding of the human brain and the biological nature of the mind will help, but it won’t be enough. How we think about mental health matters. When mental health is ultimately recognized as essential to physical health, not an extraneous element of it, then we will have access to true, complete, modern medicine

Changing the narrative and words may seem trivial but for any change to take place we need education and awareness that removes the stigma and fear associated with disorders of the brain and deliver the same compassion and care that patients with cancer or heart disease receive.

So my thoughts for some incremental improvements you can make addressing disorders of the brain

  • Words Matter – it’s not “Mental Health/Disorder” – it is Disease or Disorder of the Brain
  • Ask, listen and most importantly digest and be there as we interact with others – read Maneesh Juneja  blog – Being Human
  • From a clinical perspective – the clinical history and the detail of the Presenting Complaint and History of Present Illness remain the mainstay of diagnosis and understanding
  • Read or listen to Oliver Sach’s – you can find his books – or watch his TED Talk, or hear him on Science Friday or NPR or read one of his articles

 

What small change have you seen that makes a difference in the support of people with disorders of the brain. What one thing could we do that would have a big impact in this area?

You can also follow me here on medium, on twitter, or on facebook

 

 

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MasterChef in Healthcare: Integrating Social Media

Posted in #hcsm, #mHealth, Healthcare Technology, HealthIT, HIT, HITsm by drnic on April 15, 2015

Social Media is rapidly becoming an integral part of our lives. Despite the pervasive nature of the communication channel healthcare remains a technology laggard. This presentation from HIMSS15 Wednesday Apr 15) will offer insights to help understand why healthcare professionals should join the community, participate in the discussion and how can do so successfully.

gordon_ramsayNickasGordon

I presented this topic at HIMSS15 on Wednesday Apr 15 – you can find the listing here. As promised I am posting a summary of the points as well as a link to the Slideshare for that presentation

You can find the presentation on my slideshare (nvt) here

Master chef in healthcare- integrating social media – @DrNic1 from Nick van Terheyden

 

 

DontKNowWhichDoctor

Technology is all pervasive in our lives and Social media is everywhere – in fact in a recent survey of 3,000 people conducted in the US, UK and Germany to help counter the limited time with their physicians, patients are seeking information and embracing technology outside of the doctor’s office to come to appointments prepared. Approximately 80 percent of patients feel engaged in their own health:

  • 68 percent of patients bring a list of questions to each doctor’s consult;
  • 39 percent have checked WebMD or another online source in advance; and
  • 20 percent bring personal health data from outside monitors.

PatientsEnteringWithDigitalInformation

 

You can see some 87%o f US adults are online in this Pew internet research so if you are not on board you are missing a huge opportunity but more importantly your patients are forming an opinion about you before they meet you

 

PatientsFormedOpinion

 

 What is Social Media

  • It’s a conversation, not a lecture
  • It’s an extension of everyday interactionCollaboration
  • It’s group driven, not top-down
  • It’s messy, disorganized & hard to control
  • It’s a tool, not an end-point
  • But most of all…

 

 

If you have not already – go to twitter and sign up for an account

What to Tweet

  • What you have read that you want to share with others
  • When and where you are speaking
  • Something you post on your blog
  • A link to a Web site that you find interesting
  • Listen to conversations happening online using keywords (hashtags, lists and searches) – learn from your colleagues, friends and patients
  • Befriend people – and then earn their trust by solve problems, answering queries, helping and providing useful information
  • Share information, valuable content with them
  • Questions and Requests for information and help – crowdsourcing answers
  • At a minimum – Lurk, Listen and Learn

There are many HashTags to follow and starting by assign friends and colleagues what they follow is a a good start but then get involved – join an online chat and community and take a look at the listing of healthcare hash tags from symplur. Listed below are a few of the healthcare hash tags I follow:

#hcsm (h/c social media)
#HCLDR (healthcare leaders)
#HITsm (health IT social media)#MedEd (medical education)
#mHealth
#eolchat (end of life/elder chat)
#BCSM (breast-cancer social media)
#LCSM (lung-cancer social media)
#BTSM (brain tumor social media)
#S4PM (Society for participatory medicine)

But I received a aggregated list when I polled my followed that included all these:

Others

#QuantifiedSelf
#KareoChat
#HITChicks
#HIT
#healthIT
#hcrefor
#ACA
#ONC
#HL7
#Interop
#IoT
#HIMSS15
#POWHIT – People & Organizations improving Workflow w/HIT
#RareDisease
#foodallergy
#rheum
#bcsm
#gyncsm
#medx
#BlueButton
#patientengagement

Chats

#JACR 4th Thurs 12pm EST
#LCSM Every other Thurs 8pm EST
#BCSM Mon 9pm ET
#HCLDR Tues 8:30pm EST
#MedEd Thurs 9pm EST

and

@twubs @hashtracking or @tweetreachapp

 

My thanks to all my twitter friends who contributed

@HealthcareWen @HIMSS @lsaldanamd @sjdmd @HealthcareWen @DrJosephKim @dirkstanley @dlschermd @Docweighsin @RossMartin @CraigJoseph @RobertWahMD @ishakir @SteltsMD @JenniferJoeMD @StevenChanMD @CIBR_News @Jim_Rawson_MD @aussiclydesdale @ACRselect @AdamFuhriman @Gregmogel @ruthcarlosmd @techguy @MandiBPro @HITshrink @ahier @RandaPerkinsMD @motorcycle_guy @wareflo @susannahfox @Lygeia @ePatientDave @CMichaelGibson @Colin_Hung @annelizhannan @MelSmithJones @Paul_Sonnier @JennDennard @HIStalk @JohnNosta @2healthguru @lsaldanamd @lisagualtieri @EricTopol @ShahidNShah @DanMunro @Daniel_Kraft

 

Put yourself somewhere on the Social Media Adoption Curve

SocialMediaAdotpionCurve

 

Add LinkedIn and Facebook – they offer a different channel and voice – Facebook tends to be more social and LinkedIn tends to be more professional/business orientated

There are some good examples already out there

The Mayo Clinic has several properties and their own published guide book to social media and the University of Maryland Medical Center that has blended many channels

What Not to Do

The JAMA 2012 report Online posting of unprofessional content by medical students highlighted a high proportion of violations and problems and there are plenty of examples of people who failed use basic common sense – I personally like the 12 word Simple Social Media Policy from the Mayo

Don’t Lie
Don’t Pry
Don’t Cheat
Can’t Delete
Don’t Steal
Don’t Reveal

 

Conclusion

  • Social Media for Physicians is a Game Changer
  • Social media, when effective, will establish a physician’s brand and connect him/her with those in need of their services
  • With increased deductibles, more consumers will “shop” using social media sites.
  • Social Media will Expand the Physician’s Role with Patients
  • Social media is shaping patient encounters with physicians and that impact is expected to increase significantly
  • Extending the patient experience will foster existing patient relationships and improve patient outcomes, especially for long-term chronic conditions.

 

Where are you on the social media ladder and are you going to climb higher?

SociaMediaLadder

 

 

MasterChef in Healthcare: Integrating Social Media was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

How Good is BMI as a Health Indicator?

How do You Measure your Healthiness?

A recent conversation with my brother about Body Mass Index or BMI got me thinking about this data point and how we use it. Many of you are probably familiar with the value – it shows up on your weighing scales right after displaying your weight

Obesity BMI
Digital Weighing Scale

And if your scales don’t offer it you can always calculate your BMI with a multitude of online calculators (simply put weight divided height)

But there are some challenges with this simplistic value – not least of all the Obesity Paradox – the counterintuitive notion that obesity may be associated with longer survival.

Muscle Mass

A recent study published in PLOS One: Muscle mass, BMI, and mortality among adults in the United States: A population-based cohort study that delves into this deeper and offers some explanation of this counterintuitive notion that having a high BMI can be associated with longer survival. The results offered a clearer picture into our bodies and the relationship between these measures and our health status and long-term survival. There was lots to digest but this chart captured an essential point

Health
Risk of Mortality BMI and Muscle Mass

The Blue line represents people with “Preserved Muscle Mass” – in other words, those that have more muscle vs less. The Red Line for people who have lower muscle mass. I’m simplifying a complex detailed study a little but essentially but here goes

TL;dr: Healthier longer survival for people who sit in the middle range of BMI and have more muscle mass. For those with high or low BMI muscle mass has a positive impact on improving long-term survival

Listen in to find out the importance of Muscle Mass and what Incremental Steps you should be taking to improve your health

 

Can I ask a favor – if you like the video, please subscribe to my channel, and if you don’t leave me your feedback/thoughts on how I can improve things?

How Good is BMI as a Health Indicator? was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Future Failure Guaranteed in Healthcare

 Medical School Candidate Selection

MedEd Books Education books
Are we are selecting the wrong candidates for medical school and not teaching them the skills they really need to be good doctors?

I’m a doctor first – anytime anyone asks me what I do the first words out of my mouth are “I’m a Doctor”, followed by a follow-up explanation of my role today outside of day to day clinical medicine and the laying on of hands-on patients.

Many years ago I decided to give up my daily medical practice and it was a difficult decision. While I loved taking care of patients, I’d been beaten up in a system that pushed me to my limits and I did not like what I felt and saw in myself as I existed in a sleep-deprived haze courtesy of a 152-hour working week aka a 1 in 2.

I believed that the healthcare system was creating barriers for doing what patients really needed. And too much of my time was taken up with things that didn’t really matter. By moving into the world of technology and focusing on medical technology development, I hoped to create new tools that would improve our ability to help patients in the ways that they wanted to be helped.

My emotions about this move were conflicted, and I sought out a colleague who had been a mentor to me and shared my decision and mixed emotions about that decision. His response bewildered me.

“That’s terrible,” he said. “You never should have been allowed into medical school.”

From his point of view, the fact that a doctor was leaving the profession was not a sign that anything about the healthcare system needed to change. It just meant that the selection process for medical students was wrong and I was a flawed candidate that never should have been allowed to study medicine.

That unwillingness to examine the status quo is not uncommon in the world of medicine, especially when it comes to medical education. The current curriculum has changed very little over the past century. While science has been updated, the basic structure of medical education hasn’t changed. The daily practice of medicine, however, has changed. And it has changed a lot. Medical education isn’t preparing new doctors for the challenges they will face, and many of the skills they will need are never addressed during the four years of medical school.

But there is an even bigger problem with the medical education system: acceptance into medical school isn’t based on characteristics that are important in medical practice. We have become very focused on academic perfection and MCAT scores, with little consideration for the personality traits that lead to highly effective and compassionate physicians. We get lucky with many people, who have the academic performance and the needed personality traits, but we also train people who are not inherently suited to the practice of medicine or who have what compassion they had entering the system crushed out of them with debilitating academic testing with multiple choice questions systems. And we exacerbate the problem with a system that encourages isolation with a monstrous amount of academic study and rote learning. To excel or even survive the rigors of the system you diminish social interactions and limit them to others who are stuck in the same academic sinkhole.

We are failing to train medical students in the skills and thinking habits that make good doctors.

Recruit for compassion and intelligence, not academic perfection

The first step in getting this right is recruiting students who have more than academic skills. Perfection in academic performance is often accompanied by self-involvement verging on narcissism. To attain perfect grades in college, you have to have enormous discipline as well as intellectual ability. You also have to sacrifice time spent in other endeavors – experiences that might broaden your worldview and increase your sense of compassion. This intense focus on your own goals can create a sense that you are more important than others.

MedEd MedicalStudentID

I watch this first hand with my daughter, who makes me proud on a daily basis with her dedication and focus towards her goal – which she has had since the tender age of 5 – of getting into medical school and qualifying as a doctor. But every step towards medical school moves her inexorably away from the compassion and caring she has demonstrated on her journey thus far. Like her peers, she fears that if she doesn’t keep an intense focus on academics she will fail in her study of medicine. I know I want her as my physician but wonder if the obstacle course she must complete will change her beyond recognition.

Medical Education

 

Teach medical students skills, not just facts

Medical education is like drinking from a scientific fire hose. Few students retain more than about 50% of that data, and we neglect other skills that are more important. Doctors can instantly look up any medical fact they need so this attempted brain download of scientific detail isn’t necessary.

What isn’t taught is how to think about health, illness, and people. Medical students should be learning root-cause analysis and the ability to connect disparate pieces of data and understand the meaning. They need to learn data search skills, listening skills, problem-solving and how to be a continuous learner. They need to flex their compassion and objectivity muscles and learn the patience that will help them understand people who are different from themselves. And they need to learn leadership and how to work with others as in a team and as a team leader. These are the skills that are hard to acquire but are crucial to accurate diagnoses, more effective treatment decisions and effective management of chronic diseases.

The change is beginning

Medical schools are starting to respond to the need. In 2013, the American Medical Association gave $11 million in grants to medical schools that are developing flexible, competency-based pathways. They are making changes that will narrow the gap between how physicians are trained and how medicine is practiced. As of 2015, grants have been given to 32 medical schools, each with an innovative approach intended to prepare students for the real world of medical care. None of these programs are focused on the science of medicine, but rather the thinking, leadership and management skills needed to effectively use the science of medicine.

This is a great start, but there are 141 accredited medical schools in the U.S., and nearly 2,500 worldwide, many still using a curriculum developed more than a century ago. I hope the leaders of these schools are paying close attention to the innovations being tested under the AMA program. We all need them to do a better job of recruiting and training medical students who have the right stuff for the medical environment of this century, not the last.

Some Early Progress

The Dell UT Medical School which was funded in part with support from the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation and by a vote from local residents to increase their personal taxes to fund the development and ongoing management of this facility. They are trying a new funding model that gets rid of the conflict of interest that hamstrings many medical schools that are dependent on fee-for-service hospitals for revenue. The financial model will emphasize outcomes and cost-effective care overpayment for individual procedures and the medical school is taking a different approach to education while still encumbered by the need to meet the regulatory requirements to satisfy the medical education definitions and allow their students to compete on the current playing field for medical education the United States Medical Licensing System (USMLE) testing system

What do we need in Healthcare

More accurate diagnosis early in the disease process (12 million people annually are misdiagnosed, and about a quarter of those errors are life-threatening)

MedEd Costs

86% of healthcare spending in the U.S. was used to treat patients with one or more chronic conditions, and most of that goes for treating complications due to poor management.

Clinicians are under increasing stress and committing suicide at extraordinary rates (A systematic literature review of physician suicide shows that the suicide rate among physicians is 28 to 40 per 100,000, more than double that in the general population)

Incremental Steps to Improving Medical Education

  1. Let’s start by acknowledging the current system and trajectory is not matched to the requirements of our future doctors
  2. Find one element of the curriculum suited to a different method of teaching and change the approach. Match this with an approach to changing the testing methodology to match this more closely
  3. Enlist support to bring about change with the examining board, the clinical teachers and mentors and recently graduated doctors who can all provide relevant insights on the deficiencies of training in preparing for a medical career and what can and needs to be changed

 

Do you think I’m wrong – is our system well suited to the current requirements and just in need of some minor tuning? If I am right – what changes can we work on immediately to change the course and direction for the students now to bring about lasting improvements?

 

Future Failure Guaranteed in Healthcare was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Change Behavior, Change the World

Change Behavior, Change the World

The Incrementalist Graphic Adam Pelligrini

This week I am talking to Adam Pelligrini,(@adampelligrini) the General Manager and SVP for Fitbit Health Solutions. Adam has had a long career in the Digital Health coming from the Digital Health group for Walgreens Boots Alliance where he built a range of digital and mHealth platforms. He recently ran and hosted the highly successful FitBit Captivate conference where over 300 employers, health systems and health organizations from around the country gathered in Chicago to hear about the latest innovation in wearable personalized health technology. You can read more about it here.

The new digital space and innovations in wearables are an exploding and Adam shares his insights into what it takes to be successful in the wearable space. FitBit’s focus is on an open platform and incorporating behavioral change into the DNA of the company and these solutions have been instrumental in getting 6.8 Million people participating in population health programs with their devices!

Connecting Data Wearables

They found Incremental steps to getting people engaged in the United Healthcare Motion Program which was founded on the principle of connecting people to their data and making it simple. Their program was focused on simple small steps of  “FIT – Frequency, Intensity and Tenacity” that were tied to rewards back to the individual

 

 

Listen in to find out how they managed to record 6.5 Billion nights of sleep and added 2.9 Million participants to a new female health tracking feature with just native word of mouth!


Listen live at 4:00 AM, 12:00 Noon or 8:00 PM ET, Monday through Friday for the next two weeks at HealthcareNOW Radio. After that, you can listen on demand (See podcast information below.) Join the conversation on Twitter at #TheIncrementalist.


Listen along on HealthcareNowRadio or on SoundCloud

Change Behavior, Change the World was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Consumer Level Insights to Healthcare

Posted in bigdata, HealthIT, Incremental, Innovation, obesity, Population Health, SDoH by drnic on October 2, 2018

How Much you Travel Can Predict Your Health-Related Behavior

The Incrementalist Graphic Won Chung

This weeks interview was an opportunity to catch up with Dr Won Chung – an Emergency Room doctor and co-founder of Carrot Health – a company focusing on bringing consumer level insights, data and analysis to medicine

NewImage

His clinical career has been centered on the Emergency Room which as he describes is primarily focused on treating Accidents and Emergencies but as he has discovered where an awful lot of what happens in the Emergency room is not impacting the long term health of patients. We know that our personal behavior and the social determinants of health (SDoH) (such as gender, marriage and other consumer attributes) are not only important to health but actually are the major components of differential health outcomes and by most estimates contribute 60-80%. I make this point frequently in my presentations:

In a recurring theme on the show – the incremental insight that got him here happened when he was attending business school where he met his co-founder Kurt Waltenbaugh where they were discussing the data missing to manage patients better. As he puts it

if I knew details of what you were buying in the supermarket I could predict you HB1Ac before you even enter my clinical office

Once again – the adjacent possible discussion was the foundation for the company as they realized together that they could gather the missing data from other sources especially retail and help answer those questions.

Listen in to hear our discussion on their insights into Diabetes – a chronic disease affecting 10% of the population (that’s 30 Million people in the US) and a whole lot more that are are pre-diabetic. Hear about the two groups of patients and the correlation between the how much you travel and the success or failure of your diabetes management. Hear how pet ownership and your civic responsibility are also linked and find out which car you drive is linked to your success in managing diabetes. We talk about marriage and its effects on health offering some new and more granular insights into the benefits of marriage – the results will surprise you

You can read more about this insight here


Listen live at 4:00 AM, 12:00 Noon or 8:00 PM ET, Monday through Friday for the next two weeks at HealthcareNOW Radio. After that, you can listen on demand (See podcast information below.) Join the conversation on Twitter at #TheIncrementalist.


Listen along on HealthcareNowRadio or on SoundCloud

Consumer Level Insights to Healthcare was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Improving Healthcare’s Security Posture

Blackhat

Healthcare’s Security Posture

As part of my interview series from BlackHat I spoke with Mike Weber VP Coalfire Labs – they are a large Cybersecurity Systems provider focused on securing transactions in the cloud working with all if not most of the cloud providers. Coalfire just released their Penetration Risk Report that included a special section on Healthcare. Not surprisingly the news wasn’t good showing that healthcare had the worst “External Posture” with the least security for anything that can be seen by an attacker – external facing systems such as routers, firewalls etc.

Healthcare

The biggest issue was with legacy systems and many instances upgrades installed but the legacy and unsecured systems remain in use.

Healthcare

Listen in to the interview and hear Mike’s thoughts on Incremental Steps to combat the Security challenges faced in healthcare. As he and others have pointed out Medical records are high risk because they have such a long shelf life offering a rich vein to exploit for anyone able to steal these records.

 

Incremental Steps for Improving Healthcare’s Security Posture

 

  • Upgrade Old Systems and Importantly plan retirement for old systems as part of the upgrade
  • Consolidated Your audit program to Decrease Audit Fatigue
  • Prioritize Your “Crown Jewel’s” of the data and Systems you are protecting

Here’s the short list:

  1. Personal data is the top target (highest value) – medical identity information has a smaller market
  2. Platform Access – and the ability to install ransomware
  3. Encrypt everything

Encrypt

Improving Healthcare’s Security Posture was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Incremental Steps to Health

Incremental Steps to Health

The Incrementalist Graphic Khan Siddiqui

This week I am talking to Dr Khan Siddiqui (@DrKhan ) radiologist, programmer, serial entrepreneur, and Founder, CTO, and CMO of HIGI – the company that is taking the concepts of consumer engagement and tracking to the next level and creating actionable insights that patients and their care team can use

Much of Khan’s journeys mirrors my journey into the space of Digital Health – starting as a programmer in school where he was building applications on a PDB-11 using punch cards and continuing on through his early work on the Electronic Health Record mining data and applying machine learning and deep learning as far back as 2005 to healthcare data.

Microsoft Kinect

Listen to his story of a turnabout of shared innovation at Microsoft where the work the healthcare team had done on image analytics was applied to the Kinect bar and gaming solving one of the challenging problems of “missing body parts”

He was involved in the early work of Microsoft Health Vault and like others believed in the mission of sharing clinical data with patients and getting them engaged was a key requirement to solving health challenges – many of which are tied up with personal behavior. Frustrated by the lack of uptake compared to the Xbox gaming system he took this experience with him to found Higi and replicate the gaming user engagement and bring this to healthcare

Listen in to gain a different perspective to Xbox gaming and how healthcare has contributed and learned from this world.


Listen live at 4:00 AM, 12:00 Noon or 8:00 PM ET, Monday through Friday for the next two weeks at HealthcareNOW Radio. After that, you can listen on demand (See podcast information below.) Join the conversation on Twitter at #TheIncrementalist.


Listen along on HealthcareNowRadio or on SoundCloud

Incremental Steps to Health was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Flu and Flu Vaccination

Flu and Flu Vaccination

Vaccine
Flu Season is Approaching

This week we are focusing on the Flu and the Flu Vaccination

What is the Flu

What is flu and how does it differ from a common cold. It’s a highly contagious viral illness that does not respond to antibiotics and changes every year and infects between 5-20% of the population every year and kills anywhere from 3000 to 49,000 each year and far worse worldwide based on a recent Lancet Study that estimates deaths up to 650,000 vs Previous 250-500k

In the US the uptake of the Flu vaccination is a little over 40% in adults and a little higher in children from 6 months – 17 years at around 59%

For anyone aged 6 months and older getting your flu vaccination or shot is the best thing you can do to prevent catching the flu this winter based on your own personal health status and not having any contraindications to receiving the flu shot. Getting your  shot also contributes to the “Community Immunity” – better known as Herd Immunity:

Herd Immunity
Why Community or Herd Immunity is Important

Listen in to find out why you need to get your flu vaccination each and every year and

 

Can I ask a favor – if you like the video, please subscribe to my channel, and if you don’t leave me your feedback/thoughts on how I can improve things?

Flu and Flu Vaccination was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Tagged with: , , ,

Is Aspirin Good for Preventing Heart Disease?

Posted in Healthcare Technology by drnic on September 3, 2018

 

Heart Health
Is Aspirin Good for Preventing Heart Disease?

Aspirin

This week we are focusing on Aspirin. A drug that’s been around for thousands of years going back to the Egyptians. It has some clear uses for getting rid of pain, reducing fever and decreasing inflammation but we have found other benefits as well. It is used as an emergency treatment for anyone thought to be suffering from a heart attack – chewable and full dose aspirin if possible, and for some time, the general medical guidance has been giving a baby or low dose aspirin to help prevent heart attacks.

But that guidance has been called into question with the release of a new study: Aspirin to reduce the risk of initial vascular events in patients at moderate risk of cardiovascular disease (or ARRIVE for short)

Incremental Steps in Deciding if Aspirin is Right for You

This week’s Incremental step – educate yourself on the background of Aspirin and its use for prevention in heart disease and then if you fall into any of the potential risk categories for heart disease book an appointment to discuss aspirin as part of your healthplan

 

As the Arrive Paper concluded:

“The use of aspirin remains a decision that should involve a thoughtful discussion between a clinician and a patient, given the need to weigh cardiovascular and possible cancer prevention benefits against the bleeding risks, patient preferences, cost, and other factors. The ARRIVE data must be interpreted and used in the context of other studies, which have tended to show a reduction primarily in myocardial infarction, with less of an effect on total stroke (including both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke). The overall decision to use aspirin for cardiovascular effects should be done with the help a clinician, given the complex calculus needed to balance all potential benefits and risks.”

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Is Aspirin Good for Preventing Heart Disease? was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Unbreakable Encryption

Encryption Algorithms Under Siege

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Over the course of history, the development and subsequent breaking of encryption standards have been a constant cycle. As new keys were developed so they were broken and the speed of with which new keys were broken has increased. Modern day encryption “Data Encryption Standard” or DES was launched int he 70’s with a 56-bit key (64 bits but with 8 parity bits). This encryption was cracked in 1999 and with the likelihood, looming NIST launched a new search for encryption standards giving rise to Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) (aka Rijndael) with 256-bit keys and is under attack both cryptographically and by brute force of faster computers including as and when they arrive. As a result, NIST is seeking new proposals for cryptographic standards to replace AES when it is broken – but with the advent of Quantum computing this will be broken too

Unbreakable Encryption

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I spoke with John Prisco, President & CEO for QuantumXchange who in his words are pioneering unbreakable encryption. I know what you’re thinking – the idea of something being unbreakable/unhackable seems impossible and I was dubious as well.

But here’s what’s interesting – the foundation of the technology is the Heisenberg (no not that Heisenberg) uncertainty principle

 

You have to go deep into theoretical quantum physics to understand the background to this and while no expert I’m fascinated by the quantum world. This explanation in the Encyclopedia Brittanica is helpful comparing the concept to measuring the pressure of air in your tires TL;dr you can’t because as soon as you attach the pressure gauge you change the pressure. Essentially you can never know with perfect accuracy both of the position and velocity of a particle. It is impossible to determine accurately both the position and the direction and speed of a particle at the same instant.  You could learn more from the always brilliant Richard Feynman video Lecture: Probability and Uncertainty in Quantum Mechanics

Cryptography

Single Photon Based Encryption Keys

That uncertainty is a physical property, not a mathematical derivation (the foundation of encryption). QuantumXchange uses the quantum properties of single photons (light) to exchange data between two locations, with keys derived from the exchanged quantum information. The keys are Tamper Evident: Any attempt to intercept (look at or break) the key will change the state thanks to Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle causing a change in quantum state thereby corrupting the key – in which case those keys are rejected and a new pair created.

All this takes place on “Dark Fiber” from Boston to Washington DC and offering this up to customers in the healthcare and financial services markets and have examples already in play of oil rigs using their Quantum Keys to secure the huge numbers of IoT devices that are used in critical infrastructure and control for oil drilling and production

This concept is especially important for Healthcare data which has the longest shelf life of any data in the industry so protecting it over extended periods of time is essential if we are to maintain patients privacy and confidentiality

Here’s the Interview:

 

Unbreakable Encryption was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Artificial Intelligence in Medicine

Artificial Intelligence in Medicine – Better More Rewarding Medicine

The Incrementalist Graphic Anthony Chang

Incrementalist Chang

It was great to catch up with colleague and friend Dr. Anthony Chang (@AIMed_MD) Pediatric Cardiologist, Founder of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine (AIMed) and Director of Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute (MI3) .

How did a pediatric cardiologist find his way into the field of Artificial Intelligence, Machine and Deep Learning?

Those of you that saw the original Watson Jeopardy Challenge

Anthony like me had the same reaction to this incredible achievement by the IBM Watson team that beat out the top 2 Jeopardy champions with an Artificial Intelligence Computer system that consumed the contents of the internet library and tested out the correct answers more frequently than the two human champions.

With a background teaching statistics augmented with an MS in Biomedical Data Science/Artificial Intelligence, he has blazed a path to attract colleagues and data geeks from around the world to participate in the future of healthcare augmented by data

For those of you challenged understanding the terminology of the space this Venn diagram is helpful in putting the various disciplines in perspective

AI Deep Learning and Big Data Venn Diagram

Along the way, he like many of my other guests has discovered the value of the adjacent possible – in his case adjacent to data scientist and technologists with clinicians deeply invested in day to day clinical care – both learning from each other

We cover everything from machine learning and data science through the requirements for clinicians (or not) to gain qualifications in data science. Hear his eloquently answers the age-old question of

Will I still have a job once AI has replaced me

TL;dryes and it will be more rewarding

Join me as you hear how and why you should change the way you think of medicine and data. The good news is – you can participate in the next AI Med event which mixes specialist, clinicians, data geeks and patients from around the world in a unique experience that offers a great learning and mind opening experience.


Listen live at 4:00 AM, 12:00 Noon or 8:00 PM ET, Monday through Friday for the next two weeks at HealthcareNOW Radio. After that, you can listen on demand (See podcast information below.) Join the conversation on Twitter at #TheIncrementalist.


Listen along on HealthcareNowRadio or on SoundCloud

Artificial Intelligence in Medicine was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist