Navigating Healthcare – Patient Safety and Personal Healthcare Management

Happy Birthday to my Best Friend

Posted in Inspiration, Kenya, life by drnic on April 19, 2017

 

I married my best friend and today is her birthday. This post: If You Want To Be Successful, Marry Your Best Friend detailed exactly why.

In this world of individualized culture that focuses on independence and self-reliance I am happy to say I am not. We are one and success and failure is our success and failure. We are programmed to have relationships and to belong — for those of you skeptical or feeling like you need independence you might just be suffering from the “dependency paradox”. I give up nothing and gain everything.

people who are more dependent on their partners for support actually experience more independence and autonomy, not less

This is what I would term “Healthy Dependency” and something that contrary to some viewpoints that see this as a negative quality in a relationship it is not but rather makes me a better person, stronger and more independent, successful and happier. I depend on her — we share the ups and downs of life and travel this journey called life together

Happiness is an experience best shared and I am lucky to be sharing this with my best friend and wife

Palazzo Vecchio with Uffizi in the Background

“The need for someone to share our lives with is part of our genetic makeup and has nothing to do with how much we love ourselves or how fulfilled we feel on our own. Once we choose someone special, powerful and often uncontrollable forces come into play. New patterns of behavior kick in regardless of how independent we are and despite our conscious wills.”

I love traveling this road with you and wish you a very Happy Birthday — We are One

Or the African version from this African boy

Happy Birthday to my Best Friend was originally published on Dr Nick – The Incrementalist

Digital Health for the Undeserved

A recent report published by Jane Sarsohn-Kahn for the California Health Foundation: Digitizing the Safety Net Health Tech Opportunities for the Undeserved offers some deep insights into reaching the population most in need of help but often left out in the discussions of the latest and greatest technology to break into the news cycle.

As pointed out low-income households have access to mobile technology with 8 out of 10 sending and receiving text messages – in fact mobile phone usage and ownership mirrors the experience in Africa where many of the communities have little choice given the paucity of existing infrastructure and have bypassed the traditional communications systems in favor of mobile networks
Adults who own a cell phone, Africa

and gave rise to a whole innovation of mobile banking that originated that pre-dated, is more flexible and is more widely used than anything developed in the west (The M-Pesa system) – servicing the unbanked people of Africa without requirements to have a smart phone nor to use an app. I’ve written about the opportunity we have of learning from our African friends in the past)
In the case of the undeserved here in the US many of these people mirror these experiences and providing easy access using simple tools is effective not just from a cost standpoint (as Healthcrowd showed $1 for mobile messaging vs $34 for paper mailing) – and that’s even before you consider the engagement/response rate we find with mobile applications and interactions…think about it, when you want to reach your children do you send them an email or text them

Textpectation

 

Take the time to read about the multiple projects that are reaping big benefits and doing so cost effectively. These are real working projects with a range of technology that has demonstrable impacts and could be applied to many more groups and environments. The extensive piece takes you on a journey from everything as simple as text messaging from Healthcrowd to the medication adherence and tracking concepts of Proteus Digital Health of digestible sensors that track your pill from manufacture to ingestion.

There are a few guiding principles to help steer you to success

  • Meet people where they are – widely varied and none are typical
  • Build Trust – under promise, over deliver; everything is fragile for this community and failure can be far more catastrophic for them than “average” users
  • Address social determinants of health – just providing a ride to get to the clinic could mean the difference between success and failure and an Uber Ride is a lot more cost effective than an ambulance required for the crisis that could have been averted
  • Consider the cost of data service – data is expensive on many plans treat it like memory used to be in the days of 640K
  • Recognize the many layers of health literacy – not just comprehension but basic literacy and even language
  • Speak in the Vernacular – and make it culturally sensitive too

As Aman Bhandari said

“The new sexy is scaling what can work”

Proven solutions that have been effective provide great opportunities for those looking to make that impact on their own area.

 

 

 

Digital Health for the Undeserved was originally published on Dr Nick van Terheyden, MD

Want to See #Mobile #Health Success – Look to #Africa #mHealth

Posted in #mHealth, Africa, Disruptive, HealthIT, Kenya by drnic on October 25, 2013

I’ve said it before – Africa like many of the under developed countries is exploding with great use cases for mHealth. This piece: Kenya Has Mobile Health App Fever tracks the explosion of #mHealth.
Promoted and supported by the Kenyan Medical Association and Shimba Technologies the latest release MedAfrica offer ready access to medical information and verifying clinicians in the field and even a tool to verify the authenticity of drugs.

With over 50% of banking done by mobile phone in Kenya they are clearly adopting the platform in large numbers (Kenya is rich in mobile phones, with 25 million subscribers; Africa has more than 600 million of them). Applying #mHealth to the slew of health problems is exciting and rewarding. The size of and range of health challenges is daunting:

Many Kenyans have serious health problems; for example, according to the World Health Organization, more than 30 percent of children under age five show stunted growth. At present, only 7,000 doctors serve a nation of 40 million people. 

All this out of a company that was founded by Stephen Kyalo and Keziah Mumo, with $100,000 in seed money from a European VC

Seen here Steve Mutinda Kyalo

And its not just Kenya:

Mobile health platforms are making a strong showing in other parts of Africa, too. In South Africa, efforts include platforms that give HIV-infected patients automated ways to receive health information and reminders about upcoming doctor visits. In Johannesburg, 10,000 people infected with HIV have taken on these SMS-based alerts, resulting in big declines in missed appointments.
In Ghana and Liberia, a group called Africa Aid is experiencing strong success with MDNet, a system that allows users to call or text doctors for free. Since its founding in 2008, 1,900 physicians in Ghana have logged more than a million calls to patients, the group says.

Having real impact with that funding – awesome

Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika

You can take the boy out of Africa, but you can’t take Africa out of the boy